on findings

How Childhood Experiences Shape Belief Systems: Psychology behind the Ritchie case

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How Childhood Experiences Shape Belief Systems: Psychology behind the Ritchie case Megan Roques (@meganroques) When coding cases, we examine multiple cases with various motivations in order to determine if they fit the inclusion criteria. Lately, most of the cases that I have found have been the result of scraping documents and databases. Therefore, coding these […]

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The Process and Difficulties of Coding the Twenty-Year Old 1998 U.S. Embassy Bombings Case

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The Process and Difficulties of Coding the Twenty-Year Old 1998 U.S. Embassy Bombings Case Sara Godfrey On August 7th, 1998, trucks armed with explosives simultaneously detonated outside U.S. embassies in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya, bringing public attention for many to al-Qaeda for the first time. The explosions killed 224 people and injured […]

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Gender Disparities in Crimes of Political Violence: Revealing tPP’s Strengths and Limitations

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Gender Disparities in Crimes of Political Violence: Revealing tPP’s Strengths and Limitations Kayla Groneck Taking a step back from coding further cases for the dataset, tPP’s researchers wanted to take the time to answer some of the questions which had arisen around the trends we identified over months of researching and coding prosecutions of political […]

Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method

Conclusion: Collective reflections on tPP and undergraduate scholarship

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This post concludes our series sharing pre-publication versions of chapter introductions in our upcoming book titled “Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method” Chapter 9 Conclusion: Collective reflections on tPP and undergraduate scholarship by Anwyn Bishop, Kathryn Blowers, Megan Burtis, Morgan Demboski, Lauren Donahoe, Sara Godfrey, Brendan McNamara, Stephanie Sorich, and Madison Weaver Our team […]

Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method

“What’s in a name?”: The construction of eco-terrorism and legal repercussions of the AEPA/AETA

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This post continues our series sharing pre-publication versions of chapter introductions in our upcoming book titled “Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method” Chapter 8 “What’s in a name?”: The construction of eco-terrorism and legal repercussions of the AEPA/AETA by Athena Chapekis and Sarah Moore The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) defines domestic terrorism as“the […]

Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method

Gender, jail, and injustice: Gender interaction effects on judicial sentencing rhetoric

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This post continues our series sharing pre-publication versions of chapter introductions in our upcoming book titled “Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method” Chapter 7 Gender, jail, and injustice: Gender interaction effects on judicial sentencing rhetoric by Madison Weaver and Alexandria Doty One of the main goals of tPP is to examine how political violence […]

Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method

The impact of foreign affiliation and citizenship on the prosecution of political violence in the United States

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This post continues our series sharing pre-publication versions of chapter introductions in our upcoming book titled “Prosecuting Political Violence: Collaborative Research and Method” Chapter 6 The impact of foreign affiliation and citizenship on the prosecution of political violence in the United States by Isabel Bielamowicz Through utilizing a grounded theory approach to the Prosecution Project […]